All Hallows,  Woolsery

All Hallows Church is a spacious medieval building, generally in good repair after some major maintenance work on the tower. Little is known of the early history of the church as records were destroyed in a fire at Clovelly Court in 1790.  However, the church was formerly known as Holy Trinity and became All Hallows in the 1920s.  The church was formerly a chapelry of the parish of Hartland and was one of the properties given to support Hartland Abbey at the time of Richard I.  It was given by Hugh Peverell and thereafter served by the Augustinian canons. 

 

It became a parish in its own right about the time of the Reformation.  It has a nave and north aisle which has the vestry at the east end.  On the south side there is a transept that forms the Lady Chapel.  The South entrance is Norman as can be seen from the interior. The North Arcade has seven-foot high granite columns, believed to be brought from Lundy, which date from the 16th century.  Some Norman masonry remains in the South Transept which forms the Lady Chapel and houses the original altar.

The current number on the Electoral Roll is 27. Average Sunday attendance is 30 adults of varying ages but, at the WOW (Woolsery Open Worship) service, the number can be 30-80, an even split of grandparents, parents and children. There is one Reader in the parish.

Following considerable co-operation over many years an LEP [Local Ecumenical Project] was formed in July 1997 with the village Methodist church.

Woolsery is a rural village which has seen considerable expansion over the last 30 years and now has over 1100 parishioners. The population includes many young couples from the area and retired people as well as family groups. Some of the population work in agriculture related trades and tourism.